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The Motivational Impact of Wearable Healthy Lifestyle Technologies: A Self-determination Perspective on Fitbits With Adolescents

By Charlotte Kerner and Victoria Goodyear

About

Considerable numbers of young people are not meeting physical activity guidelines. Wearable fitness devices can provide opportunities for physical activity promotion

METHOD

The study was a mixed method sequential design. Participants were 84 adolescents (44 girls, 40 boys) from 6 physical education classes. Pupils were issued with a Fitbit to wear for 8 weeks and completed pre-/posttest questionnaires that assessed motivational regulation and psychological need satisfaction. 

Purpose

The aim of the study was to explore whether wearable healthy lifestyle technologies impacted on adolescents’ (13- to 14-year-olds) motivation for physical activity.

Conclusions

Findings suggest that healthy lifestyle technology may have negative motivational consequences. Translation to Health Education Practice: Certified Health Education Specialists should support young people to personalize health targets in order to critically engage with normalized health targets.

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DIAGNOSE

I’m a Facilitator of Learning; Understanding what Teachers and Students do within Student-Centred Physical Education models 

The role of the facilitator has become almost synonymously associated with student-centered approaches. However, how a teacher functions as a facilitator is less well defined. This article begins to define teacher action in student-centered learning environments. Through an exploration of teacher behavior, teacher–student interactions, and discussions around teacher-as-activator, the article argues that the teacher must play an active role in the classroom and should be considered much more than a “guide on the side.” Teachers should use a range of direct and indirect behaviors and dialogical exchanges to support and extend learning. These actions and interactions should be contextually relevant and aligned with the learning aims of the student-centered approach. In sug- gesting that facilitation provides a narrow perspective on teacher action, the article calls for further consideration around teacher-as-activator to consider the teacher as someone who activates new learning possibilities

Pedagogical Cases in Physical Education and Youth Sport: Chapter Abstracts for the Web

Pedagogical Cases in Physical Education and Youth Sport is a completely new kind of resource for students and practitioners working in physical education or youth sport. The book consists of 20 richly described cases of individual young learners, each written by a team of authors with diverse expertise from across the sport, exercise and movement sciences. These cases bring together knowledge from single sub-disciplines into new interdisciplinary knowledge to inform best practice in physical education, teaching and coaching in youth sport settings. The book can be found here

LOSING TOUCH - TEACHERS' SELF REGULATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

This paper takes its starting point in the discourse of child protection and the growing anxiety around intergenerational touch in educational settings. The purpose is to examine PE teachers’ self-regulation in relation to the child protection discourse and no touch policies. What sort of strategies have the teachers developed for dealing with physical contact in their teaching? The study aims to contribute to the literature on child protection and ‘no touch policies’ and to a more multifaceted understanding of intergenerational touch in PE.

RETHINKING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PEDAGOGY, TECHNOLOGY AND LEARNING IN HEALTH AND PE

In this paper, we argue that while we need to be aware of the risks, we also need to explore the opportunities for digital technologies (DigiTech) to shape HPE in new and positive ways. Specifically, we argue that a focus on pedagogy is largely missing from earlier discussions. In mapping the evidence-base on DigiTech against a three-dimensional categorisation of pedagogy – in the form of learners and learning, teachers and teaching, and knowledge and context

The paper concludes by arguing for a ‘profession-wide’ debate to co-construct, trial and evaluate new ways in which we should – and should not – use DigiTech to optimise young people’s learning in HPE.

QUALITY AND HEALTH-OPTIMIZING PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The aim of this paper is to present a conceptual assessment framework for QPE and HOPE on which future assessment protocols may be based that serve both health and educative goals. HOPE models were established using an interventionist mindset and are therefore well suited to integrating well-defined MBP pedagogies as appropriate ‘intervening’ strategies by using a clinical approach to teaching and assessment. To date, they have lacked an assessment framework that has been capable of addressing both the health and educative goals that both HOPE and MBP seek to achieve. This paper provides new insight by reimagining the role MBPs and assessment practices have to play in the health and education nexus.

RESPOND 

Live, Streamed and Open Debate Innovation in Teaching and Learning in PE

Technological innovation, economic crises, environmental and climate changes, and a whole host of other factors will continue to transform the types of knowledge and skills required in society (Apple 2014, Evans et al. 2008, Kemmis et al. 2014). Consequently, the pressures and expectations on schools and teachers to renew their practices and keep pace with change are considerable (Ball 2013, Hargreaves & Goodson, 2012). Certainly, and in using the context of the last three decades of state funded education in England as an example, education appears to be caught in a cycle of endless ‘innovation’ and there is an expectation that teachers will change their practices continuously by embedding new approaches, policies, methods and ideas (Ball 2013, Evans et al. 2008, Moore et al. 2002; Wallace & Priestley, 2013).

Must share without fear of being judged”: SNSs capacity to form engaging and impactful professional learning communities.

Teachers are increasingly using Social Networking Sites (SNSs) for self-directed professional learning (Visser et al., 2014). Moving beyond two-way conversations inherent in emails, SNSs have the capacity to form communities (King, 2012) and act as communities of practice (CoP) (Wesley, 2013). However, little is known about the characteristics of such communities or how they impact learning and practice (Carpenter & Krutka, 2014). This paper explores the characteristics of an online Twitter-based community and how different physical education practitioners were supported in their engagement and learning.  

Innovation with change: developing a community of practice to help teachers move beyond the honeymoon’ of pedagogical renovation

Physical education has long been caught in a time of ‘innovation without change’. Yet, despite a wealth of pedagogical innovations and policies, which encourage a reconsideration of the ‘traditional pedagogy’, teachers rarely move beyond the honeymoon period of implementation. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how communities of practice emerge, develop and support innovation that results in pedagogical change. Participants and setting: Six secondary school teachers from a comprehensive secondary school in the UK used the Cooperative Learning model, which was identified as the pedagogical innovation, to teach physical education for a minimum of four units of activity (6–8 lessons each). Teachers were supported by a researcher who acted as a boundary spanner. 

Tweet me, message me, like me: using social media to facilitate pedagogical change within an emerging community of practice 

The purpose of this paper is to explore how social media operates as a communicative space, external to the physical site of an emerging community of practice (CoP) that supported teachers' professional learning and their subsequent longer term changing practice. The paper explores 2125 interactions, through Facebook and Twitter, between five physical education teachers and a facilitator over a two-year period. Through social media, the facilitator re-enforced teachers changing practice, aided the development of the practices of an emerging CoP, and by the CoP situating their use of the innovation in the virtual world, teachers were supported in changing their practice over time, and the use of the pedagogical innovation was sustained. Interactions promoted teacher inquiry, challenged teachers to develop their existing use of the innovation further and encouraged them to work together and develop shared practices.

EVALUATE

Contextually Sensitive Evaluation Tools for School Based Professional Learning: A Feasibility Study

How have schools responded to changes in educational policy in relation to workplace learning, and what are the key issues and challenges that schools/teachers encounter in facilitating professional learning? How can schools evaluate the impact of school-based CPD initiatives on teachers and pupils?.

Model fidelity and students' responses to an authenticated unit of Cooperative Learning 

A wealth of school-based interventions report on students’ positive responses to the use of models-based practice in physical education. However, research that examines the effectiveness of models-based practice rarely reports on the fidelity of implementation i.e. when all of the characteristics of a model are implemented. The purpose of this study was to explore model fidelity in the use of the Cooperative Learning model. Consequently, the themes of ‘scaffolding student learning', 'working together', and 'deeper learning' could be directly linked to the authentic use of Cooperative Learning context. The paper concludes by arguing that when reporting on findings from empirical research on the use of Cooperative Learning we need to adopt a more robust approach in determining – through rigor and quality of research – the authenticity of implementation

Great Expectations: Teacher Learning in a National Professional Development Programme 

This paper reports findings from an evaluation of a national continuing professional development (CPD) programme for teachers in England. Data showed that the localized implementation, opportunities for interactive learning, and ‘collective participation’ were positive factors. Research participants reported difficulties, however, in ‘cascading’ knowledge to colleagues and in sustaining and developing their learning. It is argued that these limitations were rooted in an inconsistent theory of learning that underpinned the programme and a failure to conceptualize teachers as ‘lead learners’ in schools. Wider implications for the design of teachers’ professional development are considered

QUALITY AND HEALTH-OPTIMIZING PHYSICAL EDUCATION: USING ASSESMENT AT THE HEALTH AND EDUCATION NEXUS 

The United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (UNESCO) recognises quality physical education (QPE) must, along with physical, social and affective educative goals, seek to improve the health status of youth (UNESCO, 2015). Health-Optimizing Physical Education (HOPE) is a model of physical education (PE) that seeks this goal but is creating much debate in the discipline (Sallis et al, 2012). The aim of this paper is to present a conceptual assessment framework for QPE and HOPE on which future assessment protocols may be based that serve both health and educative goals. 

HOPE models were established using an interventionist mindset and are therefore well suited to integrating well-defined MBP pedagogies as appropriate ‘intervening’ strategies by using a clinical approach to teaching and assessment. To date, they have lacked an assessment framework that has been capable of addressing both the health and educative goals that both HOPE and MBP seek to achieve. This paper provides new insight by reimagining the role MBPs and assessment practices have to play in the health and education nexus